To Top

Gallery of Ironmen: Bodybuilding?s Betting Man

Bob McCune beat the odds on the stage and in the ring.

It's often difficult to say what a bodybuilder will do after a successful athletic career. What are the odds that one of the finest physique stars of the 1950s would end up being involved in the gambling industry? When it comes to Bob McCune, the answer is, pretty good.

McCune was born December 11, 1921, and he started working out at his home in Amsterdam, New York, when he was 17 and weighed 165 pounds. He had always enjoyed competition, and he entered many local weightlifting and physique contests. After a stint in the Navy, Bob decided to remain in Northern California, where he'd been stationed. In 1946 he opened a gym in San Francisco and continued to enter physique contests. Despite his determination and an impressive musculature, however, first-place finishes eluded him.

Bob moved south to Los Angeles, and he became a fixture on the sands of Muscle Beach. McCune continued to exercise intensely, but despite all his work and his popularity with fans and physique photographers, his bodybuilding career seemed to go nowhere. So in the summer of '50 McCune decided to try something different. He became a professional wrestler. Taking advantage of his handsome features and beautiful body, he transformed himself into 'Lord Pinkerton,' and he fought successfully for several years.

By early '56 Bob had decided to quit wrestling. He gravitated back to Southern California, where he opened a gym in Long Beach, but two years later he was selling sets of Great Books of the Western World. After that he dropped out of the physique world and turned to another interest: betting on sporting contests.

Professional gaming takes a cool head, a steady nerve and self-confidence'all qualities Bob gained from athletics. Although he experienced moderate success in a number of fields, McCune finally hit the jackpot with his handicapping advice. Bob stresses that he only places recreational bets. 'It's not my nature to gamble,' he explains. After retiring at the age of 76, Bob moved to Arizona, and he continues to place a bet or two. The former bodybuilder and wrestler still exercises, and he's currently writing an autobiographical novel. IM

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

More in

  • Quadzilla

    If your legs refuse to grow, try these eight proven tips for massive quadriceps growth.   By Vince DelMonte   The...

    Asim NaveedOctober 25, 2016
  • Homegrown

    High-quality, small-footprint devices make home-based workouts an option for busy people. By Amanda Burrill, MS I am never giving up the...

    Asim NaveedOctober 24, 2016
  • Ground Control To Major Abs

    Develop your core musculature with these three novel exercises.  By Mike Carlson   It’s not often that something new hits the...

    Asim NaveedOctober 21, 2016
  • Coffee Beats Caffeine

    Nutrition Research July – Part 1   Coffee Beats Caffeine In our cover story interview this month, actor Brock O’Hurn rather...

    Asim NaveedOctober 20, 2016
  • Muscle Research: It’s Good To Be The Swing

    Muscle Research – July 2016   It’s Good To Be The Swing Lower-back pain is a common training partner for many...

    Asim NaveedOctober 19, 2016
  • Win A Photo Shoot with IronMan Magazine

    Iron Man magazine is proud to announce a partnership with a new socially driven platform Kompetes. Kompetes is a brand-new and...

    Natalie MinhOctober 18, 2016
  • Beet Body Fat

    Beet Body Fat Betaine, also known as trimethylglycine, is a substance derived from sugar beets. It has received some hype over...

    Asim NaveedOctober 18, 2016
  • Shake It Off: Go Nuts

    The subtle nuance of pistachios makes this a protein shake for grown-up palates.  By Amanda Burrill, MS     It’s all...

    Asim NaveedOctober 17, 2016
  • The Ultimate Team Player

    New research suggests that glutamine actively contributes to the muscle-building process.   By George L. Redmon, PhD, ND     PQ:...

    Asim NaveedOctober 14, 2016